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Spanish Troops Storming over rubble strewn with British soldiers



Spain on Board!
After suffering monumental losses two decades ago against British forces during the Seven Years War (French –Indian war in The United States colonies). Two days ago on the 21st of June, 1779 Spain decided to aid America in defeating Great Britain. Arthur Lee an American diplomat to Spain stationed in Madrid had been trying gain Spain as an ally by contacting several Spanish officials. An alliance between America, France, and Spain came to fruition with the introduction and signing of The Treaty of Aranjuez. France had already aligned themselves with America on the subject of Britain but until recently Spain had not decided whether or not they would side with us , Spanish prime minister Jose Monino y Redondo, conde de Floridablanca must have seen allying themselves with America and France as in the best interest of Spain and its people. France and Spain signed the Treaty of Aranjuez on the basis that France would help Spain gain back several areas lost to Britain during the Seven Years War including Gibraltar and the Floridas. Of Spain’s part of the bargain would be to join the fight against the British alongside France and America. Also to be noted is that the annihilation of the Spanish Armada at the hands of the British could have contributed to the decision to join the war. But to us spectators of the war sitting in our houses watching our boys go meet the invaders nothing can be sure. We can only use the facts we dig up to piece together some type of indication of the motives of our compatriots. -June 23rd, 1779







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The Siege of the rock of Gibraltar located in the Mediterranean


Gibraltar: Spain’s first taste of Action-
Already being called one of the most drawn-out sieges in modern history, the siege of an area dominated by the British known as Gibraltar which is located at the
mouth of the Mediterranean began on the 24th of June ,1779 and ended last week on the 7th of February 1783. The siege was carried out by the Spanish
(led by Martin Alvarez de Sotomayor, Luis de Cordova y Cordova, and Antonio Barcelo)and the French(led by Duc de Crillon) upon the Rock of Gibraltar held by the British. This seemingly endless siege ended in favor of the British and its commanders George Augustus Eliott and Roger Curtis. The Spanish and French forces have lost 6,000 of their soldiers in the siege. 47 strong mast ships were sent out to regain Gibraltar and which the number being nine that were left after the siege. A difference of 8,367 set the Spanish and French combined mass forces above the British. It is estimated that at the start of the siege the British had 5,382 expendables at their fingertips while the French and Spanish combined had 13,749 men. While the Spanish and French efforts were ultimately in vain it shows us that the Spanish are willing to help us win this war no matter what stands in their path not even several years of devotion to a siege which cost them several thousand men and dwindled their supplies. A little over a year ago the composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart created the piece Bardengesang auf Gibraltar: O Calpe! Dir donnert's am Fusse which is about the epic siege that ended last week on the 7th .- February 12th ,1783
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George Augustus Eliott stands valiantly in his military attire




Surrender At York Town!
A fortnight ago Lord Cornwallis; one of the foremost leading generals in the British army kneeled to the might of General George Washington and his American army. After the French finally arrived to help us end this war for our Independence once and for all, Charles Cornwallis was forced to relinquish his position and surrender. What many do not know is that this America victory might not be without the influential help of the Spanish. The funds for the siege were supplied by the Spanish who raised the needed funds (which came to the amount of over 500,000 silver pesos) in 24 hours. The remarkable feat was conducted and overseen by Spanish government official Francisco Saavedra de Sangronis in Havana, Cuba. One can assume that if it were not for the efforts of the Spanish and Francisco Saavedra de Sangronis that the British army might have trampled over the Americans like the crashing tides of the shores below against child made sand fortifications. A crucial blow to the British by the American Continental army was backed by Spanish hands this much can be certain.-November the 2nd, 17


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Lord Cornwallis bows to the might of the United States




Reflection
The roar of cannon fire, the blood curdling screams of men dying, the intoxicating smell of gun powder. These are things which have been adopted as common everyday life for many Americans but no more. War with Britain is over. Independence has struck deep in the hearts of many Americans and while we pick up the pieces and try to form a government free from a tyrannical king we must also look around and reflect upon what has happened. Many have helped us in our endeavor and their actions must be recorded for posterity and the betterment of what we are trying to create. It can be said that if France had not entered the war with us we would not have won. France entering the war made it impossible for Britain to win with two countries draining their resources. But to forget our allies in the Mediterranean is truly a crime. Spain helped us in many ways that France did not, behind the scenes. Such as getting the funding in Havana for the battle of Yorktown and many other occasions the Spanish aided us.- October the 13th ,1783

?Questions?
1.Who helped finance the necessary essentials for the battle of Yorktown and where were they financed in?
2. How long did the seige of Gibraltar last and who reigned victorious in the end?
3. Name 2 ways in which the Spanish helped America during the revolution?
*Bonus*
How many soldiers did the Spanish and French forces combined lose in the seize of Gibraltar?



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Charles III of Spain